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We All Built this Country

As a firm believer and supporter of a multi-class system, I favor the ideals of Adam Smith, who in “The Theory of Moral Sentiments” (1759), established the idea of `economics fluctuating naturally (“Laissez faire economics)” also known as Capitalism, upon which we all built this country.

My love and honor for capitalism, though, comes from a larger, more negative part of history: Slavery.

As President Trump addressed the hundreds of young African Americans in honor of Turning Point USA’s Black Leadership Summit he exclaimed,

African Americans built this nation — (applause) — you built this nation. You know, you’re just starting to get real credit for that, okay? I don’t know if you know that. You’re just starting to get — you built the nation. We all built it. But you were such a massive part of it — bigger than you were given credit for.

And he is right.

Slaves were the first capitalists, and worked the first blue collar jobs in an agricultural market. As brutal as slavery was, it produced a beautiful foundation for entrepreneurship, fair wages, and creativity.

The opportunity to venture beyond the market of agriculture and banking to information technology and artificial intelligence, further allowing our great nation and citizens to thrive enabling the United States to be: Exceptional.

We live in a world where the principles of individualism are being taken over by collectivism. Capitalism is not simply a political ideology or the way in which the market works, it is also a motivator for people to do better for themselves. Capitalism discriminates against no one and is kind to those with a work ethic and determination.

Although it was never meant to supply equality, it was meant to supply OPPORTUNITY.

The opportunities provided by a free market go far beyond even creating new products or markets. In fact, one of the most important opportunities is being able to both work and buy into companies and receive dividends. Not only can you buy in, but thousands of people in the United States become and maintain their wealth by buying into the very market in which they are employed, and in no small part how we all built this country.

I enjoy living in a country where you can learn from the market because of its harsh past. As slaves often learned and the Free Market economy teaches, patience is a virtue.

This is true whether it’s waiting for freedom and change to come, or waiting for a company such as Google to develop a net worth.

Because of these experiences and the foundation for this great country and capitalist society, America is exceptional and will remain so if opportunity is present, and individualism is a solid principle.

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